Immunization schedule for your baby

From the very moment your baby is born into this world, it becomes vulnerable to a number of infections in the environment, as its immune system is not fully capable of fighting pathogens yet. However, with breastfeeding, the baby receives mother’s pre-developed antibodies and they act as shields against various infections. But, this protection does not continue forever and it completely wears off after about a year. On the other hand, there are some babies who don’t breastfeed at all.


Vaccination is the best way to protect every baby from harmful infections for a long time. It induces the formation of antibodies within the body. These antibodies fight against harmful pathogens and keep infections at bay.


Every country in the world follows a specific immunization schedule that is unique to each of them. Some vaccines given for babies in developing countries are not used in developed countries. (e.g.: BCG vaccine for Tuberculosis) However, there are a lot of common vaccines which are compulsory for every child in the world.


All the vaccines are not given at the same time. They are spaced and scheduled over a specific timeline to maximize their functions. Although you do not have to memorize each of them by heart, it is always better to know when to take your baby for his next shot.


Vaccines and their functions

HepB/Hepatitis B vaccine: Prevents hepatitis B infection affecting the liver

RV/Rota virus: Prevents Rota virus infection, a major cause of infant diarrhea

DTaP/ Diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine: A combination of vaccines. It prevents diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough). Five doses are given.

Hib/ Haemophilus influenza type b vaccine: Prevents Haemophilus influenza type b infections which can result in bacterial meningitis. Four doses are given.

PCV/ Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: Prevents pneumococcal infections. Four doses are given.

IPV/ Inactivated poliovirus vaccine: Prevents polio infection. Four doses are given.

Influenza (flu): Prevents flu. Given annually starting from 6 months.

MMR vaccine: Prevents measles, mumps, and rubella (German measles) infections. Two doses are given.

Varicella vaccine: Prevents chickenpox. Two doses are given.


Vaccination schedule according to the CDC recommendations

At Birth

Hepatitis B vaccine should be administered to all newborns within 24 hours of birth. However, children previously not immunized can receive it at any age.


At 1–2 months

Hepatitis B second dose should be administered 1 to 2 months after the initial dose.

At 2 months, the first doses of several other vaccines are also given. They are;

DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine

RV: Rotavirus vaccine

Hib: Haemophilus Influenzae type B vaccine

PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine


At 4 months

The second doses of the following vaccines are given.

DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine

RV: Rotavirus vaccine

Hib: Haemophilus Influenzae type B vaccine

PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine


At 6 months

The third doses of the DTaP and PCV vaccines are given.

The third doses of the RV and Hib vaccines will be given depending on the brand of vaccine used in the earlier administrations.


At 6-18 months

The third dose of HepB

The third dose of IPV

The Booster dose of Hib (12-15months)

The 4th dose of PCV(12-15months)

The 1st dose of MMR (12-15months)

The 1st dose of Varicella(12-15months)

The 4th dose of DTaP(15-18months)

Influenza vaccine (Flu) will be started from 6 months and continued annually.


At 4-6 years

The 5th dose of DTaP

The 4th dose of IPV

The 2nd dose of MMR

The 2nd dose of Varicella


Some vaccines can cause allergic reactions in your baby. Therefore, if your baby has developed allergic responses for medications on previous occasions, it is better to inform the medical personnel about it before administration.

Team Papabambino, September 21st, 2017,